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> Improved heat shield for Twin SU C-series engines
webmonster
post 27 Aug 2013, 06:59
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My ex-student has come up with the first prototype improved (hopefully) carburetter heat shield:
Attached File  DSCF8849.JPG ( 114.2K ) Number of downloads: 0


It is made out of thicker steel and comes up higher at the back to protect the float chambers better. It is also slightly longer from front to back.

I need to give it a trial fit before sending it off to be HPC coated. Having only just got the car back on the road I'm in no huge hurry...

This should also fit 6/90 -> 6/110 (if we leave off the cut-out for the Isis' engine mount) if anyone is interested.
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enigmas
post 28 Aug 2013, 00:59
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Looks like a job well done. As an alternative, why not create a return bleed from the fuel line near the carburettors (1/16" orifice) and return this 'fuel bleed' to the tank. This method allows the fuel to remain cool and also bleeds the system of airlocks. It will also counter any percolation of fuel if under bonnet temperatures are high.
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Llansadwrn
post 28 Aug 2013, 15:53
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QUOTE (enigmas @ 27 Aug 2013, 18:59 ) *
Looks like a job well done. As an alternative, why not create a return bleed from the fuel line near the carburettors (1/16" orifice) and return this 'fuel bleed' to the tank. This method allows the fuel to remain cool and also bleeds the system of airlocks. It will also counter any percolation of fuel if under bonnet temperatures are high.


Wouldn't you also have to put a pressure regulator (presumably set at 2 to 4 psi or so) in line after the T piece to maintain pressure to the float valve? I presume that's why you say to use a small orifice, but I know that in vehicles that I have worked on with a recirculating system, some kind of pressure regulator is universally fitted.
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