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> "It's a Champ - Oh no it's not", It's a Wolseley Mudlark!
Mrs Nishka
post 19 Oct 2017, 22:04
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A great picture below to show the differences between Andrew's our member with a Wolseley Mudlark and an Austin Champ. I’ve lost count of when the Mudlark has been at a show and people walk past, stop and say “That’s a Champ”. “Oh no it’s not”, we all say, “It’s a Wolseley Mudlark”… a long conversation then ensues. Andrew has had leaflets made and the public have been delighted with these. Great vehicle.

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Mrs Nishka

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Steve Darnell
post 20 Oct 2017, 07:33
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Easy to tell which is which.......... The Wolseley only has 1 wiper.
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Fred Oldham
post 20 Oct 2017, 08:19
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It’s also the one that an elephant hasn’t sat on.
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rustyroger
post 20 Oct 2017, 10:36
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I was intrigued, so I looked up the Mudlark online. Is there a Gutty in existence anywhere?. I wonder why Wolesley was selected to develop a military 4WD?. I didn't know they had any history of off-road vehicles.
Actually I know almost nothing of pre-war off-road vehicles at all. Anyone got any links to where I can find out more?.
I lived on a farm in the mid 1960's that had a Champ. The main thing I remember about it was it was often broken down waiting for parts. As a 12 year old boy I thought it was huge fun to ride in.
Also it was the first vehicle I ever drove. On the farm of course!.

Roger.

This post has been edited by rustyroger: 20 Oct 2017, 10:37
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Penguin45
post 20 Oct 2017, 12:36
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There's a Gutty in the Museum of Army Transport in Beverley. "Gutty 4wd" in Google images pulls up some nice pics.

P45.
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ozieagle
post 20 Oct 2017, 21:29
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It can't be a Wolseley, no flying W in the grill.

Herb
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ahctog
post 21 Oct 2017, 00:07
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QUOTE (rustyroger @ 20 Oct 2017, 11:36 ) *
I was intrigued, so I looked up the Mudlark online. Is there a Gutty in existence anywhere?. I wonder why Wolesley was selected to develop a military 4WD?. I didn't know they had any history of off-road vehicles.
Actually I know almost nothing of pre-war off-road vehicles at all. Anyone got any links to where I can find out more?.
I lived on a farm in the mid 1960's that had a Champ. The main thing I remember about it was it was often broken down waiting for parts. As a 12 year old boy I thought it was huge fun to ride in.
Also it was the first vehicle I ever drove. On the farm of course!.

Roger.

Wolseley had experience of every type of transport, probably more so than any other company. Air, sea, road and rail..... and military including tanks. Many other companies turned to Wolseley for their specialist knowledge and products......see also the Nuffield Oxford Taxi.
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Andrew Wardle
post 21 Oct 2017, 17:17
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Hi there.
Marilyn just alerted me to the Forum activity concerning the Mudlark, which I own.
I rarely use the Forum so it was welcomed news to hear that it's creating interest.
I've had a glance down at other comments and I can clarify a few points for everyone.

The original project was to replace the wartime Jeep, huge numbers of which were used by the British during WW2. William Morris (Lord Nuffield) saw it as an opportunity to improve the fortunes of his company so Nuffield produced two working prototypes and a mock-up for the War Department to test. This was in 1947.
It was given the project number FV1800 ('FV' for Fighting Vehicle) and the tests simply showed the shortcomings of the design ! The WD told him to go away and try again!
He gave the project to his Wolseley division and they came up with the second iteration of the FV1800. By this time the WD had also decided that the 'new Jeep' must use the smallest of the standardised Rolls Royce 'B'-series engines, the B40 (B=B-series. 4=4-cylinder. 0=3.5"bore). The new one was totally different to the first.
Wolseley produced 12 of this vehicle, christened them 'Mudlark' and all were given to the MoS and the Army for exhaustive testing.
They were all 'struck off census' i.e. deemed surplus, in the late 50s and sold off at auction.
One ended up in India, nobody knows how and the other is in my shed and appears from time to time at WOC events.

Following tests of the Mudlark the next stage of design was the FV1801 and this became the visually similar Austin Champ, just under 12,000 of which entered British Army service between 1952 and 1956.

One of the two first generation prototypes remains. An earlier contributor to the Forum correctly identified it as once being housed in the Museum of Army Transport at Beverley near Hull. This closed many years ago and the vehicle went into long-term storage at Donnington, near Telford, where I photographed it some years ago. The army then decided they'd got no money and offered the entire (huge) collection to the then British Motor Industry Heritage Trust Museum (now the British Motor Museum) at Gaydon in Warwickshire. The curator visited the collection and dismissed it all until he was told that Alec Issigonis had had a big hand in designing the FV1800. Suddenly it was of interest and it was given by the army to the museum where it now resides.
When under test at Chertsey in Surrey in the late 40s one of the visiting top brass asked the test drivers, Titch Tombs and Reg Banyard, what they thought of it. They replied that it "was an ugly bugger but it's got some guts." So it started off being called the 'Gutsy' which was later changed to 'Gutty'.
Once I learn how to insert photos I'll put some on !!
Cheers. Andrew Wardle.
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rustyroger
post 23 Oct 2017, 16:45
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Thank you Andrew.
I'm always interesting in learning more about the history and development of old vehicles.
It means I can look at the vehicles on display at shows and have some understanding of their place in automotive history.

Roger.

This post has been edited by rustyroger: 23 Oct 2017, 16:47
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