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> The Guzzler is back in action!
webmonster
post 18 Jan 2017, 08:56
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You know how it is. "I'll take it off the road to get a few jobs done"...
Off the road for 6 months!

Anyway, Lisa and I had it up and running and test drove it around the quiet back streets here (all two of them!) (IMG:style_emoticons/default/smile.gif)
Very satisfying, and things started moving quickly in the last week or so.

I took out the master cylinder quite a few months ago because I had another one all rebuilt to replace it. Finally put this in a few days ago.
Before this I cleaned out the inside of the chassis rail where it sits, applied fisholene and waited (quite) a few days for the smell to subside.
Next, I wanted the pedals rebushed to take out as much slack as possible. Unfortunately the replacement bushes from MGOCspares were still too big even though the pedal pivot pin was not very worn.
Ralph decided that polishing the pivot pin and making up new bushes would be the best solution - and it worked really well:
Attached File  20170117_150236sm.jpg ( 153.08K ) Number of downloads: 0


He also drilled out the holes for an oversize pin that connects the pedals to the yokes for the pushrods.
I had new pushrods and pedal return springs to fit from MGOCspares.

Bleeding the brakes was a pain. It turned out the tube-with-one-way-valve that I purchased had seized up - even lots of compressed air could not make it budge. Harumph!
I cut off the faulty valve and away we went.

Other recent job:
Coolant drained and cylinder head re-torqued, with nice slippery grease supplied by the company who did the cylinder head work and modifications (Engine Rebuilders in New Plymouth). The grease looks a lot like copperslip.
I particularly wanted to check the torque of the short bolts, because I couldn't remember if I put enough grease on the threads before torquing down. In addition we put a bit of thread sealant tape around the plugs for the top of the manifold, just to be sure that extra air wasn't getting in.

Rockershaft torqued down with nicer washers and valve clearances set. Some of the old washers were quite pitted ad nasty looking!
Cork rocker cover gasket and rubber seals for the nuts are quite new and all looked OK.

I reattached the battery and got the fuel pump to fill up the SUs and with ignition off I turned over the engine, then came back the next day...

...and it started up almost immediately. Hurrah! Sounds great (IMG:style_emoticons/default/smile.gif)
Brake and clutch pedals work beautifully.

Next things to get done:
- Replace all seals in the wheel cylinders. Cylinder bores were stainless steel sleeved, so should not be a big job but I can't do it - the brake return springs are too strong for me to remove the brake shoes!
- Even with the engine warm there is a hesitation on accelerating when you push the pedal down a lot, but seems OK at slight throttle openings. Any suggestions?

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enigmas
post 18 Jan 2017, 09:43
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Use a heavier grade oil in the dashpot. The greater the viscosity of the oil the more initial resistance to the piston lifting by the damper. By initially lifting slower the air slide induces a richer mixture but once on steady throttle, the air slide will reach its normal equilibrium so fueling and economy is unaffected.

Try using oil ranging from thin ATF to a heavy gear oil and everything in between.
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ozieagle
post 18 Jan 2017, 10:42
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QUOTE (enigmas @ 18 Jan 2017, 20:43 ) *
Use a heavier grade oil in the dashpot. The greater the viscosity of the oil the more initial resistance to the piston lifting by the damper. By initially lifting slower the air slide induces a richer mixture but once on steady throttle, the air slide will reach its normal equilibrium so fueling and economy is unaffected.

Try using oil ranging from thin ATF to a heavy gear oil and everything in between.


I agree that the viscosity of the oil affects the take up.

MGBs like engine oil. I use 30 grade, but as Engimas said try different ones.

Herb
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webmonster
post 19 Jan 2017, 20:56
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Aha!
OK - so you both suspect that the hesitation on acceleration is due to the mixture being too weak at that moment?

The original spec was SAE 20, wasn't it?
I've certainly got a bottle of SAE 30 lying around...
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enigmas
post 19 Jan 2017, 22:05
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It could also be that the float level is too low or the needle and seat is restricted (blocked). Don't just limit your dashpot oil experimentation to 30 weight. Also the initial static timing could be too retarded (set it up using a vacuum gauge) or the advance mechanism partially seized or stiff.
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Danny
post 20 Jan 2017, 00:57
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Some years ago, as in more than ten, when the fuel here in Sydney was inconsistant at best, I went through the same type of thing. What worked best was that based on an unsubstantiated theory that unleaded fuel ran around 2% (IIRC) leaner than the old stuff I tried the specified rich needles for my state of engine tune and have stuck with them ever since.

I also more recently ditched the ATF that I swore by for years and now use 20/50 (I think). One thing that I have noticed is that since we have stopped refining our own fuel here, and I believe the stuff we get here in Sydney at least is from Singapore, my engine has a more consistant and stable idle and is noticeably more responsive...and I haven't fiddled with anything (in the engine bay) for years.

So, obviously, this can't last as I hear they want to phase out my preferred grade of petrol 95 unleaded. I must point out too that all the above refers to non ethanol stuff which we are lucky enough to be able to avoid as the plague!

Danny
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enigmas
post 20 Jan 2017, 01:22
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Fair comment Danny...petrol is not the same substance it was when our classics were new. Ethanol laced fuels are destructive to fuel systems in our classics and certainly won't even get a guernsey in the one modern I own.
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webmonster
post 21 Jan 2017, 09:23
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Thanks for all the input so far (IMG:style_emoticons/default/smile.gif)

So I've taken the air cleaners off and will replace the cork gaskets - they were getting too squashed.
Gave pistons and dashpots a careful wipe and refilled dampers with SAE30.

Interestingly one of the dashpot dampers seems to 'work' differently to the other. Lifting the piston using the pin one moves more easily than the other, but lifting both pistons further using my fingers they seem the same. I swapped the dampers over and the behaviour followed the piston.
Without the dampers in place the pistons fall at the same rate.

Does any of this matter?
I tried swapping out one of the pistons for a spare one and broke the fibre washer. Are the washers special SU sizes?
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enigmas
post 21 Jan 2017, 09:39
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Yes it does. Both pistons need to fall at the same rate. John Twist (of University Motors) has a video on Youtube (somewhere) outlining the process in matching the rate of fall.

PS. I hope you haven't been polishing the inside of the airslide housing or the sealing face of the airslide!

This post has been edited by enigmas: 21 Jan 2017, 09:39
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webmonster
post 22 Jan 2017, 20:47
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QUOTE (enigmas @ 21 Jan 2017, 22:39 ) *
Yes it does. Both pistons need to fall at the same rate. John Twist (of University Motors) has a video on Youtube (somewhere) outlining the process in matching the rate of fall.

PS. I hope you haven't been polishing the inside of the airslide housing or the sealing face of the airslide!

That is an excellent video - thankyou.

And no - I haven't been polishing the inside bits - just a wipe and a clean.
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webmonster
post 26 Feb 2017, 09:09
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Righto, so dashpots and pistons are now better matched, dashpot dampers are filled with SAE30 and I've checked the balance at idle and it all looks and sounds nice.
I've fixed the RH front sidelight/indicator bulb holder, given the car a clean inside and out and greased the steering etc, so once I get the wheel cylinder seals replaced I think that it is ready for a WoF check. Hopefully I can get these done this week (IMG:style_emoticons/default/smile.gif)

This post has been edited by webmonster: 26 Feb 2017, 09:12
Reason for edit: spaghetti.
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webmonster
post 13 Mar 2017, 08:37
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Finally got the Guzzler to the brake specialist on Friday. The master cylinder seal for the clutch bore failed so I had to take it out again along with the pedals.
A bonus of removing the pedals again is that I got a grease nipple installed in them. So, between the new bushes and the grease there is no play at all and there should be no wear in them for evermore (...well, almost).

Righto, so got the pedals and master cyl back in, bled clutch & brake systems and drove into town. I need help with replacing the wheel cylinder seals because the brake shoe return springs are too strong for me to remove the brake shoes!

The wheel cylinders were stainless steel sleeved last time around, so hopefully this is a straight forward job.

I liked the drive into town - everything seemed to be working really well. The Isis can cruise really effortlessly at 60mph, although I need to sort out the seals around the front door windows - there is a lot of wind noise.

The other irritating thing was that the idle speed died right back while waiting at the 2nd set of traffic lights. I'm not sure what may have caused this. I set the idle speed when I balanced the carbs.
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wolseley16/60aut...
post 13 Mar 2017, 09:06
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When you balanced the carbs did you use a Gunson Carbalancer or a piston lift detector ?
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webmonster
post 14 Mar 2017, 04:45
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QUOTE (wolseley16/60auto @ 13 Mar 2017, 22:06 ) *
When you balanced the carbs did you use a Gunson Carbalancer or a piston lift detector ?

I used a Gunson Carbalancer.

What be this fancy piston lift detector that thee speaketh of?

...unless you mean a length of tube and one of my ears (IMG:style_emoticons/default/smile.gif)
I have a good sense of pitch (I think...) but I have not been able to use the 'length of tube and an ear' method.
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enigmas
post 14 Mar 2017, 06:11
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I prefer to use the Heisenberg Axial Flow Meter...or one of these. (IMG:style_emoticons/default/rolleyes.gif)

(IMG:http://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/390927686361-0-1/s-l1000.jpg)


Only a few know, how much one must know to know how little one knows.
Werner Heisenberg.

or

Hire a teenager while they know everything!

This post has been edited by enigmas: 14 Mar 2017, 06:15
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ozieagle
post 14 Mar 2017, 07:00
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I found those Unisyncs much over rated. Good for a single speed setup only.

A much better way is to use two pieces of wire, then you can check sync over the whole rev range.

Herb
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DRON
post 18 Apr 2017, 09:23
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QUOTE (webmonster @ 18 Jan 2017, 18:56 ) *
You know how it is. "I'll take it off the road to get a few jobs done"...
Off the road for 6 months!

Anyway, Lisa and I had it up and running and test drove it around the quiet back streets here (all two of them!) :)
Very satisfying, and things started moving quickly in the last week or so.

I took out the master cylinder quite a few months ago because I had another one all rebuilt to replace it. Finally put this in a few days ago.
Before this I cleaned out the inside of the chassis rail where it sits, applied fisholene and waited (quite) a few days for the smell to subside.
Next, I wanted the pedals rebushed to take out as much slack as possible. Unfortunately the replacement bushes from MGOCspares were still too big even though the pedal pivot pin was not very worn.
Ralph decided that polishing the pivot pin and making up new bushes would be the best solution - and it worked really well:
Attached File  20170117_150236sm.jpg ( 153.08K ) Number of downloads: 0


He also drilled out the holes for an oversize pin that connects the pedals to the yokes for the pushrods.
I had new pushrods and pedal return springs to fit from MGOCspares.

Bleeding the brakes was a pain. It turned out the tube-with-one-way-valve that I purchased had seized up - even lots of compressed air could not make it budge. Harumph!
I cut off the faulty valve and away we went.

Other recent job:
Coolant drained and cylinder head re-torqued, with nice slippery grease supplied by the company who did the cylinder head work and modifications (Engine Rebuilders in New Plymouth). The grease looks a lot like copperslip.
I particularly wanted to check the torque of the short bolts, because I couldn't remember if I put enough grease on the threads before torquing down. In addition we put a bit of thread sealant tape around the plugs for the top of the manifold, just to be sure that extra air wasn't getting in.

Rockershaft torqued down with nicer washers and valve clearances set. Some of the old washers were quite pitted ad nasty looking!
Cork rocker cover gasket and rubber seals for the nuts are quite new and all looked OK.

I reattached the battery and got the fuel pump to fill up the SUs and with ignition off I turned over the engine, then came back the next day...

...and it started up almost immediately. Hurrah! Sounds great :)
Brake and clutch pedals work beautifully.

Next things to get done:
- Replace all seals in the wheel cylinders. Cylinder bores were stainless steel sleeved, so should not be a big job but I can't do it - the brake return springs are too strong for me to remove the brake shoes!
- Even with the engine warm there is a hesitation on accelerating when you push the pedal down a lot, but seems OK at slight throttle openings. Any suggestions?


I now know exactly how you feel! While keeping my Isis on the road I proceeded to rebuild the boot area - new boards, repainted shelf and new rubber mat, cut and shaped to fit the well. Then along came the replacement fuel pump so that went in. Did not cure the starting problem so I went electronic (Powerspark). In that went, with a new Lucas Sports coil. Also replaced HT leads and dizzy cap. Fixed the cold start problem but hot start issue remained. As I was spending so much time around the car, I also decided to check our the slow return of the clutch pedal and after grinding off the necessary screws was able to open the cover over the chassis rail. And there it was - rusted return spring with one end missing in action. So picked up a 100/6 spring from the Healey Factory and proceeded to clean out the chassis rail. Chose epoxy anti-rust paint to treat it. Pivot pin was also well worn and managed to trace a replacement from nearby MGA spares shop - Ballinghall Spares in West Heidelberg. A tad longer than the original but some packing washers fixed that. Greased all moving parts and then cursed for over 30 min as I struggled to thread the return spring into the lower hole in the rail. It was ultimately just a matter of finding the best tool to hold it and stretch it into place, given the tiny working space. That tool turned out to be a grooved door card tool that allows you to pop fir clips etc. The all heck broke loose. I refitted old regulator and erratic charging continued. Did all the static Lucas generator and regulator tests and all seemed to be in order, mostly. Then decided to drop the switch tray and measure voltage at various points. Sure, got 12.8v regularly but then turned lights on and lost all power! Had 12.8v still but nothing would function - lights, fuel pump, etc. Indicators did work but they are on a separate circuit. So started to track down a high resistance point. Was initially fooled by measuring 12.8v at each of the ammeter contacts. Scratched head for an hour or two, lots of close reading of wiring diagram. Then decided to remove instrument cluster and look behind. Voila!! Seriously blackened lead into one side of ammeter. Removed said instrument and found zero current flow, ie., very high resistance across contacts. Slowly took it apart and found evidence of heat into the insulator plate inside the ammeter, causing it to crumble. Brown/black oxide discolouring of screw and nuts. The instrument itself is simple and robust - a moving fixed magnet attached to the needle with current in/out via a single loop wire that induces magnetic response proportional to the current, hence moving needle. Local electronic kit store (Jaycar) provided electronic board from which I cut and shaped a replacement internal insulator plate Screws and nuts cleaned up in mild acid solution and then wire brushed clean. I had to grind off two brass hollow rivets to open the ammeter and did not replace them. Chose instead to use very small amount of contact glue to refit face plate to body. Used new nylon washers and fibre washers to ensure good external insultation. Cut burned input lead and fitted with new connector. All went back in less that an hour and Isis behaved by starting sweetly at first attempt. Even the original regulator problem seems to have gone so my guess is that once charging current went over, say, 15 amps the heating effect and increasing resistance into the faulty ammeter lead/connector started to play havoc with the system. All up, I spent three days off the road. The ammeter rebuild itself took several hours so I understand why the instrument shops charge so much for rebuilds. New boot as follows:

Attached File  170325_Isis_new_boot_fuel_pump.jpg ( 400.2K ) Number of downloads: 0


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webmonster
post 20 Apr 2017, 23:06
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Hi Dennis,
Wow! You've got heaps done!
Refitting the pedal return springs is a real nuisance. I was annoyed to have to do this twice, however when I removed the brake and clutch pedals the 2nd time I had grease nipples installed.
So... an MGA pivot pin can fit in our Oxfords/Isis/Cowleys! That is good detective work.

I would never have thought that so much electrical system problems could come from the ammeter. Makes sense in that all the output from the generator goes through the meter.
The boot looks really good - nice job.
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webmonster
post 20 Apr 2017, 23:13
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So... nearly there with the Guzzler.
After getting all the brakes sorted a few weeks ago it was pinged on a WoF test for a bit of rust in the near side sill/wheelarch.

I asked a friend in India if repair sections were available the this area... and they are!

I got him to send me a pair and they arrived the other day, so I went to the body repair store yesterday and he says it will take a couple of hours on Monday. Then I can finally have a WoF for the car and drive it (IMG:style_emoticons/default/smile.gif)

Edit: will get photos once I can find a working USB cable to connect to my cellphone. I suspect that teenagers have skulked off with any working USB cables...

I'm still looking into why the car begins to idle slowly and stall when the engine is hot and it has been sitting for a few minutes.
It did this when I got home yesterday.
The rubber fuel lines and fuel bowls do not feel particularly hot to touch.
I topped up with a 1/4 tank of fresh petrol, but I guess that still means there is 3/4 of a tank of 8 month old petrol. 95 octane, no ethanol content.

This post has been edited by webmonster: 20 Apr 2017, 23:26
Reason for edit: USB cable
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webmonster
post 25 Apr 2017, 09:26
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Huzzah! A working USB cable was found.

Repair section...
Attached File  20170419_152924.jpg ( 136.63K ) Number of downloads: 0


...and finished repair.
Attached File  20170424_174025.jpg ( 172.24K ) Number of downloads: 0


Now need some paint to be matched. I'd like to get quite a bit of the white paint refinished because of moisture underneath... but I'm not sure that is in the budget in the near future (IMG:style_emoticons/default/sad.gif)
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