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> Harting electronic fuel pump
austinlancer1962
post 11 Jan 2017, 10:23
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Hi Guys and Gals
Today, as I was riffling around in the "chookshed",(the Victorian Wolseley car clubs, spare parts depot)" looking for repairable
replacement for an SU fuel pump that perished on my 6/80, I came across a great copy of one called a Harting. Now after inspecting
it, I decided it was going to be one of the three pumps I was going to get, the other two being SU's. The Harting's internals being
dare I say it, MUCH, MUCH better than the SU type. I personally don't know whether I'll use this pump yet, as I like originality,
hence the other two SU's for reparability (no I'm not buying a modern SU).
HOWEVER
I'd like to ask the question does anyone know ANYTHING about this brand, as there is nothing about them on the net,
they seem to have been around in the early sixties?, and May have been a German company? maybe.

can anyone "chook"shed any light?
I'll post a photo tomorrow if anyone's interested, but its late now
Attached File  2017_01_12_10.47.57.jpg ( 1.76MB ) Number of downloads: 0

Harting on the left, SU on the right.

This post has been edited by austinlancer1962: 12 Jan 2017, 02:19
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Penguin45
post 11 Jan 2017, 11:46
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Harting became HUCO and appears to be still going strong. You can certainly buy all sorts of HUCO pumps.

P45.
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ozieagle
post 12 Jan 2017, 19:31
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Hi,

Interesting.

A couple of comments.

That Harting pump does eem to have much beefier points than the SU, so that may affect the longevity of it.

The SU needs an arc suppressor, or the points won't last long.

Herb
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Danny
post 12 Jan 2017, 23:57
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The only slight thing that I've heard against the Harting is that spares parts are hard to come by, unlike the SU. Perhaps they're not needed as often!

Danny
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Penguin45
post 13 Jan 2017, 00:04
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As far as i can tell, there are no spares for the Harting pumps at all. The MGB fora have several discussions about whether SU components can be used or not. By and large, not as far as I can tell.

P45.
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austinlancer1962
post 13 Jan 2017, 09:53
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Good evening
thank you for your interest and info.
Since originally writing this I have found out they are a post war west German company, and as Penguin45 pointed out they
are now HUCO, to which the modern variety seems to distantly resemble SU's.
My example seems to have been a sixties earlier type which has an almost slanderous similarity to a SU, apart from the visual
aspect, the six screw positions for the magnet to screw into the pump are in identical positions. So too are the mounting bolts
under the pump, I even think that a SU diaphragm would fit, but hadn't taken mine out for a comparison. The points being the
only thing not changeable and I also think that this pump is a high pressure unit, to which I cant use.

As stated in my original post, I'm a stickler for originality (where practicable), and so are putting together an aluminium based
Low pressure SU pump as to the diagrams in the 6/80 workshop manual. I had a brass bodied Su (which needed a new diaphragm
in it), but thought that that model was probably more applicable to an early model 6/80 rather than a "54", (brass body pump is a
keeper)!

HANDY HINT
(Thanks to the "Totally T-Types" fantastic website)
To find if an unidentifiable SU fuel pump is a Low pressure or High pressure pump, disassemble the diaphragm and measure the
width of the protruding magnet core (in the middle of the diaphragm housings recess).
Low pressure will measure 15mm
High pressure will measure 18.5 to 18.6mm

This is particularly handy, as if you put a high pressure pump (which are supposed to be placed near the fuel tank), on the
bulkhead where a low pressure pump is supposed to sit. You will find that the carburettor that is closest to the pump will flood and
leak like a sieve.
Mick
Attached File  2016_11_06_11.49.13.jpg ( 1.23MB ) Number of downloads: 0


This post has been edited by austinlancer1962: 13 Jan 2017, 10:42
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ozieagle
post 13 Jan 2017, 19:04
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QUOTE (austinlancer1962 @ 13 Jan 2017, 20:53 ) *
This is particularly handy, as if you put a high pressure pump (which are supposed to be placed near the fuel tank), on the
bulkhead where a low pressure pump is supposed to sit. You will find that the carburettor that is closest to the pump will flood and
leak like a sieve.
Mick
Attached File  2016_11_06_11.49.13.jpg ( 1.23MB ) Number of downloads: 0


Is this from experience or "hearsay"?

As far as I know, either pump works with SUs. The low pressure one is about 2.5 psi whilst the high pressure on is about 3.5 psi. SU carbs work well up to about 4 psi, like with Facet pumps that put out the 4 psi.

Herb
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austinlancer1962
post 13 Jan 2017, 21:34
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This is from experience and an agreed upon by most members of my car club, and it stands to reason. If they were interchangable why would the produce two variants? The prewar Low pressure pumps were 1.5PSI and the High were 3PSI, and immediately post war cant see any reason for them changing the output's. I'm sure a low pressure pump would work mediocrely if fitted to the rear ( even though the low pressure pumps are now quite rare) but put a high pressure one on the bulkhead and the added pressure is too much for the needle and seat and you get flooding, (and a fire in your engine bay is the last thing you want). By what I understand the pumps were moved close to the petrol tanks to solve the problem of vapourization, which the bulkhead mounted ones sometimes suffered with in hot weather. And because of this there needed to be a pressure increase in the pumps.
Mick

This post has been edited by austinlancer1962: 13 Jan 2017, 21:48
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enigmas
post 13 Jan 2017, 22:18
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Mick, if you create a small bleed (1/16" port) back to the tank from the carburettor unions, the vaporization issue can be countered as there is constant flow of fuel through the lines ameliorating vapourisation. This mod is counter to an OEM originality focus though if this is paramount to your restoration.
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